Two Deep Water Training – Which is Better?

Effects of two deep water training programs on cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in senior men.

By Ana Carolina Kanitza, Rodrigo Sudatti Delevattia, Thais Reicherta, Giane Veiga Liedtkea, Bruna Pereira Almada, Luiz Fernando, Martins Kruel  from the Exercise Research Laboratory, Physical Education School, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil; Rodrigo Ferrarib from the Sogipa Physical Education and Sports College, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil & Exercise Pathophysiology Research Laboratory, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil; Stephanie Santana Pintod and Cristine Lima Alberton from the School of Physical Education, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, RS, Brazil | April 2015

This study aimed to investigate the effects of two deep water training programs on cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in senior men.

Thirty-four senior men were placed into two groups:

  1. Deep Water Endurance Training (n = 16; 66 ± 4 years)
  2. Deep Water Strength prior to Endurance Training (n = 18; 64 ± 4 years)

The training period lasted 12 weeks – 3 sessions per week. The resting heart rate and the oxygen uptake at peak (VO2peak) and at the second ventilatory threshold (VO2VT2) were evaluated during a maximal incremental test on a cycle ergometer before and after training. In addition, maximal dynamic strength (one repetition maximum test –1RM) and local muscular resistance (maximum repetitions at 60% 1RM) of the knee extensors and flexors were evaluated.

After the training period, the heart rate at rest decreased significantly, while the VO2peak and VO2VT2 showed significant increases in both groups (p<0.05). Only the VO2VT2 resulted in significantly greater values for the deep water endurance training [group 1] compared to the deep water strength prior to endurance training [group 2] after the training (p<0.05). In addition, after training, there was a significant increase in the maximal dynamic strength of the knee extensors and the local muscular endurance of the knee extensors and flexors, with no difference between the groups (p > 0.05).

In summary, the two training programs were effective at producing significant improvements in cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in senior men. However, deep water endurance training [group 1] at high intensities provides increased cardiorespiratory responses compared to deep water strength prior to endurance training [group 2] and results in similar muscular strength responses.

 

References links: